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Student News Site of Ruben S. Ayala High School

Bulldog Times

Pledge of Allegiance: To say or not to say?

There has been a noticeable decline in the Pledge of Allegiance participation within the classroom. Students and teachers are not mandated to say the pledge, often leaving the classroom full of silence during the fourth period announcements. “It’s just quiet. Students just arent into it. I think students dont even want to say it out loud,” Integrated Math 3H and AVID 9 teacher Joy Rouchon said.
Pictured: Roman Soto (12)
David Jung
There has been a noticeable decline in the Pledge of Allegiance participation within the classroom. Students and teachers are not mandated to say the pledge, often leaving the classroom full of silence during the fourth period announcements. “It’s just quiet. Students just aren’t into it. I think students don’t even want to say it out loud,” Integrated Math 3H and AVID 9 teacher Joy Rouchon said. Pictured: Roman Soto (12)

As years have passed, there has been a noticeable decline in the Pledge of Allegiance participation within the classroom. Students and teachers are not mandated to say the pledge, often leaving the classroom full of silence during the fourth period announcements. Whether it is because of personal beliefs or a lack of knowledge about the pledge, everyone has their own personal reasons as to why they do or don’t participate.

Some students on campus do not feel like the American flag is worth being said, as they are not proud of the country’s history. They choose not to say it because of their own personal values, which is allowed by the first amendment – the right of speech. These students are often found sitting during the pledge or doing various other activities.

With that being said, there has been a noticeable decline in participation after specific events happen, like the passing of a bill or the new election of a political member. After the Black Lives Matter protests and the police riots for example, more students felt inclined to not participate in the Pledge of Allegiance during that time. This results in many students not only refusing to say it, but also not even standing for it as their own form of protest.

“After certain big events involving our government, I notice a decline. However, when everything ‘looks’ good or not big things are going on in protest, everyone stands,” Elijah Ortega (12) said.

The Pledge of Allegiance means several reasons to a multitude of people. It can mean a promise of loyalty to the United States, a tradition, or a way to honor our country and citizenship.

— Elijah Ortega (12)

For others, saying the Pledge of Allegiance is a big part of the person’s upbringing and feels that the flag should continue to be respected.

“I have a lot of pride in the fact that I’m an American. My dad’s a Vietnam veteran and we always hung our flag on holidays,” Integrated Math 3H and AVID 9 teacher Joy Rouchon said. “It’s always just been like a special thing to me. It just feels like it’s part of my life. It’s just what we do.”

In the end, choosing whether or not to say the Pledge of Allegiance is a personal choice that does not affect one another.

“The Pledge of Allegiance means several reasons to a multitude of people. It can mean a promise of loyalty to the United States, a tradition, or a way to honor our country and citizenship,” Ortega concluded. “Standing for the pledge to me is a way of showing respect and honor to our country.”

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About the Contributors
Rachel Dunn, Assistant Features Editor
Rachel Dunn (12) is a first-year journalist for the Bulldog Times. Rachel is looking forward to using her passion for writing to inform students about the current and local issues within Chino Hills. Additionally, she is excited to build new friendships with people who have the same passion for writing as she does. Outside of journalism, Rachel is the vice president and former secretary of Ayala’s Christian club. She uses her leadership skills to help students grow their relationship with Christ. When she is not at school, Rachel can most often be found at Trader Joe’s, where she works. She loves her job and the people that she works with. In her free time, Rachel enjoys reading, art, Netflix, and long afternoon naps.

David Jung, Staff Member
David Jung (10) is a writer for the Bulldog Times, and this is his 1st year on staff. David hopes to write articles for future members to read and for them to write stories that will surpass his own. He looks forward to seeing how the process will work out and seeing all members in action. He is also part of the Ayala Tennis team, being in J.V . In his free time, he enjoys playing video games, listening to music, making model kits, reading all kinds of books, eating many sweets, and taking good naps (if he can in the first place).
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    Reginald JohnsonFeb 4, 2024 at 3:58 pm

    Saying pledged of allegiance is a personal choice

    Reply